One important component of weddings is the wedding invitation. This thing provides guest with pertinent information regarding the wedding and some rules that must be followed by the guests. However, when preparing invitations, there are some important things that about-to-married couples should consider.

  1. WHEN TO SEND THE INVITATIONS

Invitations should be sent out six to eight weeks before the wedding. This time period allows guests to make the necessary adjustments to their schedules and to make their own preparations as well. Moreover, those who live out of town can book hotel reservations or search for a place where they can stay before/after the wedding. In case of destination wedding, guests should be give more time, and thus invitations should be sent out at least three months before the big event. On the other hand, other couples prefer sending out save-the-date cards, which are delivered six to eight months before the wedding.

  1. SETTING THE DEADLINE FOR RSVP

The RSVP date should be set two to three weeks before the wedding. This period will allow couples to make the final head count and organize the seating chart. For guests who have not sent any response yet, couples should drop them a message or call them and ask for their RSVPs.

  1. WHERE TO INCLUDE INFORMATION ABOUT WEDDING WEBSITE

Wedding websites can be included with save-the-dates or in the form of small cards included in formal invitations.

  1. INCLUSION OF REGISTRY INFO IS A NO

Including registry information on invitations or save-the-date is discouraged as guests may consider it to be impolite. Providing such information implies that guests should provide gifts. Couples should just relay this information to close family and friends and let these people spill the details to other guests.

  1. HOW TO INFORM GUESTS NOT TO BRING THEIR KIDS

The invitations should be enough to accomplish this goal. Invitations should include names of each guest, and guests should realize that the invitations are meant only for those whose names are included. For those who included their children’s names with their reply, about-to-be-wed couples should call such people and explain the nature of their wedding.

  1. INFORMING GUESTS ABOUT THE DRESS CODE

Information on dress code can be placed at the lower right-hand corner of invitations. Phrases, such as “black-tie,” “cocktail attires,” or “casual attire” will suffice. Invitations with formal and traditional letterpress and calligraphy will already give guests an idea on what to wear in the wedding. Meanwhile, square invites using playful fonts and bright colors imply that the event requires casual wear. Details on dress code may also be included in the wedding website.

  1. WHETHER TO INCLUDE A PLUS-ONE

It is not always necessary to invite guests to attend the wedding with a date. This is especially true when the invited person is single. Moreover, plus-ones are not preferred when couples are having a small wedding that includes only family and close friends. In case, that a guest replies with plus-one, couples should call them up and explain why bringing a date is not possible. Still, consideration should be allotted for those with partners.

  1. WHERE TO PLACE THE RETURN ADDRESS

Return address is ideally placed on the back flap on the envelope. The address should be that of the person who will receive response cards. Response person can be one of the couple or their partners. RSVP envelopes should also include this information and postage.

  1. DO NOT INVITE PEOPLE TO THE CEREMONY ONLY

It is unusual to allow only the immediate family to attend the wedding reception and make guests attend the ceremony only. Normally, when invitations to weddings imply attending both the ceremony and reception.

  1. INVITING A FRIEND WITH A PLUS-ONE WHOSE NAME IS NOT ON THE INVITATION

Couples may decline to accepting plus-one especially when the name is not indicated in the invitation. Basically, invitations are non-transferrable for people invited by their name. Couples should explain carefully why they are refusing a plus-one whom they did not originally invite.

Weddings